Sneak Previews

How to Learn Philosophy in Six Hours and Fifteen Minutes

Follow @WRLBooks “Beginning of modern thought.” Witold Gombrowicz starts his guide through modern philosophy with characteristic concision. The “First Lesson” is a description of Kant’s contributions to philosophy, with some explanation of Descartes to see where Kant is coming from. Gombrowicz — playwright, diarist, novelist, and thinker — leaps through

Continue reading…

Abolitionism, Yellow Fever, and the Legacy of Slavery: Excerpt from Ship of Death

In 1792, the Hankey left Britain full of abolitionists who hoped to establish a colony free of slavery in West Africa. Botched negotiations with local tribes and the failure of the colony sent the Hankey on a trip around the Atlantic with a terrible infestation of Yellow Fever. Billy Smith

Continue reading…

Who “Owns” Literature? Printing, Publishing and Copyright

Who owns a book? Does it belong solely to the person who bought that copy, or to the author? And how does the publisher come into the picture? In this excerpt from A Little History of Literature, John Sutherland explains the various people and processes involved in the production of

Continue reading…

What Is Literature?

John Sutherland’s A Little History of Literature tackles a very big subject: the glorious span of literature from Greek myth to graphic novels, from The Epic of Gilgamesh to Harry Potter. In this excerpt from the book, Sutherland addresses a fundamental question: what exactly is literature? Most of us encounter

Continue reading…

The Men Who Lost America: “The Tyrant”

As we transition from American History November to Holiday Gift-giving December, we are sharing a series of previews of Andrew Jackson O’Shaughnessy’s profiles of the British leaders during the American Revolution from The Men Who Lost America, beginning with King George III. Each profile looks carefully at the myths that have develop around each

Continue reading…

Sneak a Peek at THE EROTIC DOLL: A Modern Fetish

Follow @yaleARTbooks Marquard Smith is research leader and head of doctoral studies in the School of Humanities, The Royal College of Art, London, and editor-in-chief of the Journal of Visual Culture. In February 2014, we will publish a new book by Marquard, entitled The Erotic Doll: A Modern Fetish.  This

Continue reading…

Monday Inspiration: Leonard Bernstein Memorializes JFK and We Memorialize LB with a Spotify Playlist

50 years ago today, Leonard Bernstein gave a speech at the “Night of Stars” memorial to President Kennedy at Madison Square Garden. In mourning the loss of this beloved President, Bernstein honored Kennedy’s support of the arts and called upon his fellow artists to strive for new artistic heights in

Continue reading…

The Mayoral Impact: First the Cities, then the World

Boston and New York are entering new eras in their respective histories. Boston’s Mayor Tom Menino is ending his 20-year period in office while Michael Bloomberg is stepping down after serving the city of New York for 12 years. More than ever before, mayoral elections are being closely watched by

Continue reading…

Sneak Preview: Comics Art, by Paul Gravett

Follow @yaleARTbooks In February of 2014, Yale University Press will release an exciting new book on the history of comics: Comics Art, by Paul Gravett, the man the Times of London called, “the greatest historian of the comics and graphic novel form in this country.”  The book will explore the varied

Continue reading…

All the Rage

The year was 1897 and Camille Pisarro, in Paris, wrote to his son, Lucien, in London, that “No one pays any attention nowadays to anything but prints; it’s a rage, the young generation produces nothing else.” Printmaking, which had until the mid-nineteenth century served chiefly as a mechanism for reproducing

Continue reading…