Tag colonial america

Sarah Osborn: Early American Evangelical, Part II

Sarah Osborn— February 9, 1752, Sabbath evening Ah, Lord, how deceitful do I find my heart to be. How often have I thought I desired nothing more of this world’s goods, but just daily food and raiment and wherewith to render to everyone their due. Yea, I have once and

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Sarah Osborn: Early American Evangelical, Part I

Catherine Brekus— What can the story of an eighteenth-century woman’s life tell us about the rise of evangelical Christianity in America? This is the story of Sarah Osborn, a woman born three centuries ago, and the strange yet familiar world in which she lived. Strange, because she rejected many of the

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Lest We Forget: The Pilgrims’ Foul Bodies

Follow @yaleSCIbooks Sarah Underwood— I assume that this week, the halls of elementary schools across America have been decorated with Pilgrim men and women, whose shiny buckles and white aprons were cut cleanly from construction paper. I don’t remember ever drawing stains or smudges on my Pilgrims’ clothing as a

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The Hanging of Thomas Jeremiah

Not all slave owners were white. On the eve of the American Revolutionary War, South Carolina’s slave population was nearly double that of white Europeans, and while there were a still a handful of free blacks, “free” took a marginalized status in the face of color discrimination. Perhaps the richest

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To London, with Love: For the Returns Shopper

Ivan Lett Admittedly, it’s a bit early in the season to think about gift returns, but today is the anniversary of the Boston Tea Party. The 1773 Tea Act was hardly a gift, but unless you’ve been hiding under the harbor all year, you know all about the current political

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Notes from a Native New Yorker: Trading Ideas with the Past

Michelle Stein Yale Press’s books manage to take the reader all across the world, and look in depth at a great many topics.  They also have a great many books that delve into the city of New York, where I was born and have thoroughly explored.  I hope to also

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Comanche Lands

On a surface level, Pekka Hämäläinen’s Comanche Empire exposes and defends an overlooked narrative in American history. His book tells the story of the Comanche people, from their first mention in the ledgers of a Spanish colonial official in 1706 to their decimation by famine and an expanding United States

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Flavell: When London Was Capital of America

This Sunday the New York Times Book Review featured an excellent review of Julie Flavell’s “When London Was Capital of America”, an historical appraisal of the cultural, political and economic significance of the city on the Thames in the early 18th century. As Flavell recounts, London in the decades before

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Adorno nominated for National Council on the Humanities

Congratulations are in order for YUP author Rolena Adorno, who was recently nominated by President Obama to serve as a member of the National Council on the Humanities. As Chair of the Department of Spanish and Portuguese at Yale University, Adorno focuses on Colonial Spanish American literature and history. Her

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Congratulations to three award-winning YUP titles

The announcement came out this week that three Yale Press titles won awards. Two of them, The Arts in Latin America and Surrealism and the Spanish Civil War, will share the Eleanor Tufts Book Award of the American Society for Hispanic Art Historical Studies The Arts in Latin America by

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