Tag december theme

For the Artist within the Scientist

When researchers communicate their findings, it’s not just the math and science that they should be concerned about—it’s also the art that counts. More specifically, the graphics that visually represent scientific data and concepts play a crucial role in clarifying or strengthening an argument, as Felice C. Frankel and Angela

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Staff Holiday Picks: For the Radical Photographer

Follow @yaleARTbooks Yale University Press Executive Editor, William Frucht, weighs in on the history of photography and its intersection with art and politics from the pages of The Radical Camera: New York’s Photo League, 1936-1951, by curators Mason Klein and Catherine Evans; the catalogue accompanies an exhibition currently on view at the Contemporary

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For the Prolific Writer of Letters

If there is one thing more depressing than reading other people’s old letters it is reading one’s own. – The Letters of T.S. Eliot, Volume 3: 1926-1927 Volume 3 of The Letters of T.S. Eliot picks up where the first and second volumes left off, chronicling the years 1926-1927, a

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John Sutherland on Kurt Vonnegut

Some authors create from scratch, imagining situations and characters to fill their pages; others live and write their realities. In John Sutherland’s playfully encyclopedic Lives of the Novelists: A History of Fiction in 294 Lives, he works to catalog the methods and experiences of 294 notable writers. In this passage,

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For the Devoted Teacher

When Anna Catherine Bahlmann was twenty-four years old, a young girl named Edith Jones became her newest student. Bahlmann constantly had to add more folklore and poetry to the German curriculum to satisfy Jones’ ever-expanding curiosity. Sensing the girl’s potential, Bahlmann carefully preserved the early letters exchanged between the two

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Staff Holiday Picks: From the Director

John Donatich— This year I loved reading books that couldn’t help but get tangled in the web of presidential politics.  Mickey Edwards was both prophetic and prescriptive in The Parties Versus the People: How to Turn Republicans and Democrats into Americans, carefully reviewing the symptoms of a political system effectively

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For the Busy Lover of Science

It’s no easy feat to provide an account of the entire history of science in a single book, much less make that history a “little” one: nevertheless, an undaunted William Bynum sets out to fulfill this very task in his latest project. A Little History of Science traces the march

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To London, with Love: For Every Man of Words

Ivan Lett— Rare is the book campaign that immensely satisfies both personally and professionally. As work began for The Richard Burton Diaries, edited by Chris Williams, there was a typical shape to the assumptions for such a book coming from Yale University Press: “Oh great, the diaries of the Victorian

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John Sutherland on Vladimir Nabokov

Vladimir Nabokov’s Lolita has become a literary classic, read over and over by those who cannot pull themselves away from Humbert Humbert’s troubling yet tragically beautiful prose. In John Sutherland’s Lives of the Novelists: A History of Fiction in 294 Lives, he traces beloved authors like Nabokov back through when

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For the Harlem Renaissance Man

Emily Bernard starts her biography, “This book is a portrait of a once controversial figure, Carl Van Vechten, a white man with a passion for blackness.” And while today more people can recognize Carl Van Vechten as a patron and leader of the black arts and Harlem Renaissance movement, in

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