Tag june theme

Delving into The Zelmenyaners with Sasha Senderovich

The Zelmenayers is one of the great comic novels of the twentieth century, following a Soviet Jewish family through four generations as they deal with political change, new technologies, and the transformation of Jewish Life. Jewish scholar Sasha Senderovich, in a recent conversation with the Yiddish Book Center, explains, in

Continue reading…

Jeffrey S. Cramer Explores the Fascinating Life and Ideas of Thoreau

Jeffrey S. Cramer, award-winning editor of six previous volumes of works by Henry D. Thoreau, offers yet another insightful look into Thoreau’s life and writings in Essays: A Fully Annotated Edition. This rich volume chronologically traces Thoreau’s contributions to periodicals, newspapers, and compendiums as well as his lectures. It recreates

Continue reading…

How to Read Literature : Your Guide to Summer Reading

Attention students who have gotten their summer reading assignments and probably haven’t thought about cracking them open yet, read this first. In How to Read Literature, Terry Eagleton helps readers deepen their experience by asking seemingly obvious questions, and pointing out which questions we don’t ask of the books we

Continue reading…

An Interview with Author Arturo Fontaine by Translator Megan McDowell

We are pleased to release an exciting interview between Arturo Fontaine and Megan McDowell, author and translator respectively of La Vida Doble, which is now available to the English speaking world through Yale University Press’s Margellos World Republic of Letters series. In the interview, Fontaine and McDowell discuss what it

Continue reading…

Ivan Brunetti’s Aesthetics : Book Trailer, Cartoon Caption Contest, Bookmarks, Signed Copies, CLICK ALREADY!

Ivan Brunetti is one of the great contemporary graphic artists. His signature, highly evocative style often captures a moment of acute absurdity, or humor, or melancholy, with text that is painstakingly edited to a minimalist perfection. We’d like to give three of you a signed copy each of his marvelous

Continue reading…

June Theme: Summer Reading

We’re a little late getting started with sharing our Summer Reading  list with you—can you really blame us with the New England summer thus far?—but there’s still plenty of books for us to talk about this month! With updates to our Freshman Reading catalog, we’ll sponsor a Goodreads giveaway for

Continue reading…

The Gateway Arch : A National Icon with a Troubled Past

An abstract and mysterious structure, the Gateway Arch in St. Louis conveys wonder, but leaves many visitors questioning the “why” behind the monument. Its history is surprisingly sordid. In The Gateway Arch: A Biography, a new addition to the Icons of America series, author Tracy Campbell documents the series of

Continue reading…

New Light Shine

When Shannon Murdoch, author of New Light Shine, was asked about memory in an interview for the Australian Stage, she responded: I think memory is a need, up there with food, shelter and love. It’s how we know who we are, how we choose our friends and enemies, how we interact

Continue reading…

Akiko Busch on Citizen Science: An Excerpt from The Incidental Steward

Akiko Busch’s new book, The Incidental Steward: Reflections on Citizen Science, plots the course of one individual and her interactions with the natural world. While most of her work is related to saving the Hudson River, this book works to understand all forms of citizen science, from community clean up

Continue reading…

The “Real” John Keats

History has a funny way of romanticizing the past, blurring the lines between hard facts and fluffy representations. Painters, poets, actors — the public romanticizes their lives, creating narratives of inspiration and untouchability. This principle is even more drastic in studying and discussing Romantic poets, whose lives we associate with

Continue reading…