Tag october theme

Stranger Than Fiction: The Story of Octavia, Daughter of God

It is 1919, the First World War has just ended, and people are at a genuine loss— but in Bedford, a group of middle-class English women have a solution: they form a new religion. They choose Mabel Barltrop, a widow recently released from the asylum, as their leader. They name

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The Life and Death of the Scientific Buddha

Follow @yaleSCIbooks When we speak of the “Buddha” in the West today, are we really referring to the one born 2,500 years ago, or are we just invoking a more recent, Westernized incarnation of him? In his latest book, The Scientific Buddha: His Short and Happy Life, Donald S. Lopez,

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The Message and the Book: Understanding Religious Diversity Through Sacred Texts

Recently, a user on Reddit, a popular social news sharing site, posted a photo of a Sikh woman with a facial hair commenting, “I’m not sure what to conclude from this.” It was posted in a thread labeled “funny,” in an attempt to publicly humiliate the woman. But then the

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October Theme: Religion

As we consider 2012 as a whole, following closely on last month’s discussions on political economy, religion may have assumed a more central role in global culture—conflicts and revolutions, apocalyptic predictions, elections, scientific discoveries—despite an increasing insistence on secularist thought throughout much of the world. In addition to Yale University

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Celebrating St. Francis of Assisi through the Art of Biography

Today, October 4, is the feast day of St. Francis of Assisi, the Catholic Church’s patron saint of animals and the environment. On this special day, many people celebrate by taking their pets to churches for a special blessing ceremony. Here at Yale Press, we’re marking the occasion a little

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Benny Morris’s 1948 Reconsidered

Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu delivered a speech ensconced in a dramatic performance in front of the United Nations General Assembly on Thursday night. The highlight of Netanyahu’s delivery, which captured media attention everywhere, was the “clear red line” he drew over a cartoon-like bomb with a fuse, a diagram

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A Tale of Three: Political Culture and Codes in the Hebrew Bible

The Hebrew Bible, the twenty-four books that make up the Old Testament of the Christian Bible, tell the stories of the creation of the earth and the founding of the Jewish religion.  In God’s Shadow: Politics in the Hebrew Bible, Michael Walzer engages in a decade-long process of researching how politics

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Reshaping the Mold: Adapting Religion to Latin America

Ferdinand and Isabella, Catholic monarchs of Spain, are often remembered by their association with the famous sea voyage in history: Christopher Columbus’ journey to the Americas in 1492. In New Worlds: A Religious History of Latin America, John Lynch explores the influence of the Spanish monarchy, and later the Pope, on

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Certain of What We Do Not See: What the Higgs Boson Says About Our Quest for Truth

Follow @yaleSCIbooks Last week, an announcement was made by CERN (The European Organization for Nuclear Research) that has set the scientific community buzzing. It confirmed that two separate teams working with the Large Hadron Collider – a machine that collides atomic particles at incredible speeds in the hopes of detecting

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Eminent Biography: Joshua Rubenstein on Leon Trotsky

For our latest “Eminent Biography” installment, Joshua Rubenstein reflects on his writing of the tumultuous political career of Leon Trotsky: A Revolutionary’s Life, the latest in Yale University Press’s Jewish Lives series. Often remembered as persecutor turned persecuted, Leon Trotsky was a central figure in the global political drama between

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